Fixed lines

Setting up a phone line in Turkey

Since Turk Telekom holds a monopoly on the fixed-line market, it is the only company that can provide you with a new phone line. As with all monopolies, Turk Telekom´s hold over land lines translates to high calling rates.

Fixed lines

To put an existing phone line into your name you must bring a copy of your passport and a bill from your line´s owner to the Turk Telecom offices. If your passport uses any alphabet other than Latin you must have it translated before you can use it to switch or purchase a phone line.

If you are buying or renting a property and there is an existing phone line, make sure there are no any outstanding bills. You will inherit the costs and will not be allowed to make or receive phone calls until those bills have been paid.

Keep in mind that you can’t switch a phone line to your name unless you have residency or citizenship in Turkey, and that there is also a small connection fee for each phone line.

How to get a phone line in Turkey

As long as you are a resident you will have no problems getting a phone line in Turkey. Go to a major post office branch with copies of your passport, your bank details, and proof of address.

Turk Telekom offers five different tariff options, all based on how often you use your land line. There are tariffs for “light” and “heavy” users, and also for people who move house during summer months.

Since these tariffs can be a confusing, you should research them beforehand. Ask advice from friends and neighbors, too. Most importantly, consider how often you will be using your land line and who you will be calling (international calls in particular will empty your bank account in a hurry).

You can pay your monthly phone bills at your city´s main post office branch, or can arrange to have payments withdrawn directly from your bank account.

Payphones in Turkey

If you don´t want to subscribe to your own land-line, you can use a public payphone. Public phones are common throughout Turkish cities. They operate with a phone card, and some even accept major credit cards. These, too, are run by Turk Telekom, and though the tariffs are still high, using them may be cheaper than having a fixed-line installed in your home.

Again, costs will depend on the number, type, and destination of your calls.

To put an existing phone line into your name you must bring a copy of your passport and a bill from your line´s owner to the Turk Telecom offices. If your passport uses any alphabet other than Latin you must have it translated before you can use it to switch or purchase a phone line.

If you are buying or renting a property and there is an existing phone line, make sure there are no any outstanding bills. You will inherit the costs and will not be allowed to make or receive phone calls until those bills have been paid.

Keep in mind that you can’t switch a phone line to your name unless you have residency or citizenship in Turkey, and that there is also a small connection fee for each phone line.

How to get a phone line in Turkey

As long as you are a resident you will have no problems getting a phone line in Turkey. Go to a major post office branch with copies of your passport, your bank details, and proof of address.

Turk Telekom offers five different tariff options, all based on how often you use your land line. There are tariffs for “light” and “heavy” users, and also for people who move house during summer months.

Since these tariffs can be a confusing, you should research them beforehand. Ask advice from friends and neighbors, too. Most importantly, consider how often you will be using your land line and who you will be calling (international calls in particular will empty your bank account in a hurry).

You can pay your monthly phone bills at your city´s main post office branch, or can arrange to have payments withdrawn directly from your bank account.

Payphones in Turkey

If you don´t want to subscribe to your own land-line, you can use a public payphone. Public phones are common throughout Turkish cities. They operate with a phone card, and some even accept major credit cards. These, too, are run by Turk Telekom, and though the tariffs are still high, using them may be cheaper than having a fixed-line installed in your home.

Again, costs will depend on the number, type, and destination of your calls.

Further reading

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