Looking for work

How to find a job in Norway

Norwegians make a habit of networking and rely on personal recommendations in order to find a job. If you have few or no connections in Norway, you will find it difficult to penetrate the Norwegian job market.

Looking for work

In order to overcome this competitive advantage of Norwegian applicants, make sure you use as many different job search channels as possible. Establish yourself early on in the application process by contacting prospective employers at the earliest opportunity, sending open applications and presenting your skills and qualifications.

Under Norwegian law, all available job vacancies need to be reported to the Norwegian employment service. The Kompass Norge is an excellent source with which to find out information and details on prospective employers, and then send speculative applications to any of interest.

If you are lucky enough to have friends or business contacts in Norway, ask them for tip-off's, as the majority of jobs in Norway will be found through your existing network.

Norwegian newspapers will advertise many available positions, but it is becoming increasingly popular for employers to use the internet as their sole advertising channel. Many job vacancies are only advertised via the company's website, and some companies will only accept applications that have been submitted through their own electronic application system. For this reason, it is important that you know what kind of job you wish to apply for and the type of company you wish to work for.

Professional resources

Foreigners looking for job vacancies in Norway should become acquainted with the country's trade publications and books. The Bronnoysund Register Centre  has lots of useful information on almost 400,000 business enterprises.

As previously mentioned, one of the best ways to find a job in Norway is to network. By joining and frequenting networking organisations, expatriates will find useful connections and business opportunities (the Rotary and the Lion's Clubs are good examples of this). You should also bear in mind that the majority of Norwegian cities have their own Chambers of Commerce which are useful when searching for a job.

Job search resources

Many companies in Norway are relying on online job sites to help them recruit workers. This is especially the case for positions within the IT and health care industries, as there is a shortage of qualified employees for these jobs.

On the other hand, many temporary jobs in Norway are rarely advertised through an official channel, so a foreign job applicant may have more luck by directly sending a CV to prospective employers.

You can also look at the job advertisements in Norway's newspapers, for example Dagens Neringsliv  and the Thursday edition of the daily newspaper, Aftenposten.

The largest databases for vacant positions are the Norwegian Labour and Welfare Organisation  and Finn  – an online website for job advertisements. You can also call the NAV Service Centre EURES on +47 800 33 166 to ask about available vacancies.

It is a good idea to prepare your questions regarding available jobs beforehand, and also have a basic idea of where you would like to live in Norway.

In order to overcome this competitive advantage of Norwegian applicants, make sure you use as many different job search channels as possible. Establish yourself early on in the application process by contacting prospective employers at the earliest opportunity, sending open applications and presenting your skills and qualifications.

Under Norwegian law, all available job vacancies need to be reported to the Norwegian employment service. The Kompass Norge is an excellent source with which to find out information and details on prospective employers, and then send speculative applications to any of interest.

If you are lucky enough to have friends or business contacts in Norway, ask them for tip-off's, as the majority of jobs in Norway will be found through your existing network.

Norwegian newspapers will advertise many available positions, but it is becoming increasingly popular for employers to use the internet as their sole advertising channel. Many job vacancies are only advertised via the company's website, and some companies will only accept applications that have been submitted through their own electronic application system. For this reason, it is important that you know what kind of job you wish to apply for and the type of company you wish to work for.

Professional resources

Foreigners looking for job vacancies in Norway should become acquainted with the country's trade publications and books. The Bronnoysund Register Centre  has lots of useful information on almost 400,000 business enterprises.

As previously mentioned, one of the best ways to find a job in Norway is to network. By joining and frequenting networking organisations, expatriates will find useful connections and business opportunities (the Rotary and the Lion's Clubs are good examples of this). You should also bear in mind that the majority of Norwegian cities have their own Chambers of Commerce which are useful when searching for a job.

Job search resources

Many companies in Norway are relying on online job sites to help them recruit workers. This is especially the case for positions within the IT and health care industries, as there is a shortage of qualified employees for these jobs.

On the other hand, many temporary jobs in Norway are rarely advertised through an official channel, so a foreign job applicant may have more luck by directly sending a CV to prospective employers.

You can also look at the job advertisements in Norway's newspapers, for example Dagens Neringsliv  and the Thursday edition of the daily newspaper, Aftenposten.

The largest databases for vacant positions are the Norwegian Labour and Welfare Organisation  and Finn  – an online website for job advertisements. You can also call the NAV Service Centre EURES on +47 800 33 166 to ask about available vacancies.

It is a good idea to prepare your questions regarding available jobs beforehand, and also have a basic idea of where you would like to live in Norway.

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