International schools

Schools for foreigners in Egypt

If you intend on having a child while in Egypt, or bringing your children with you to Egypt, you will most likely choose to have them educated in an international school.

International schools

There are international schools located throughout Egypt, modelled on a number of foreign education systems. International schools usually cover education from kindergarten to the end of secondary school, though some also have pre-school programs for children as young as 3. The majority teach using either the British or American curricula (see below for some examples).

British Schools

  • British School of Alexandria (Alexandria)
  • EBIS (New Cairo – outside Cairo)
  • El Gouna International School (El Gouna – near Hurghada on the Red Sea)
  • Maadi Community School (Cairo)
  • New Cairo British International School

American Schools

  • Cairo Modern House (Giza, Cairo)
  • EAIS (New Cairo – outside Cairo)
  • International American School of Alexandria (Alexandria)
  • Misr American College (New Cairo)
  • New Generation Schools (Cairo)

Others

  • Cairo American College (Cairo, International Baccalaureate)
  • Ecole Moliere (Alexandria, French curriculum)
  • Greenland Pre Vert International School (International Baccalaureate)

Admissions

You will likely find the admissions process for international schools quite intense. If your child does not speak English, he or she may have to pass an English as a second language (ESL) test before even being considered for admission.

You should also be prepared to provide records of academic performance from previous school years (and in some cases letters of reference from school officials!). Do not be surprised if the school requests that you, your child and/or your spouse meet with the school superintendent for a personal interview prior to admission. For more specific information you should contact the school of your choice prior to enrolment.

Fees for private schools in Egypt

International schools the world over are known for their exorbitant fees. In Egypt, yearly tuition for a first-grader can cost well in excess of USD5,000! By the time your child reaches the upper grade levels, you may well find yourself paying more than you would for a university education at home. In addition, most schools usually charge a one-off admission fee of between USD1,000-2,000.

There is little you can do to defray this cost, aside from shopping around. You may be assessed additional fees on a yearly basis to defray the cost of activities and uniforms (almost all international schools require students to wear uniforms).

Fortunately, if your employer is arranging for you to relocate to Egypt, you may be able to arrange for compensation for your children’s schooling (in the same way that you may be given a housing allowance or a “hardship” bonus). If your employer does not mention schooling when initially discussing your compensation, make sure to broach the subject. Obviously, if you are looking for work in Egypt (as opposed to being transferred by your current employer) you will probably not have this luxury.

Choosing a school

Choosing a school for your child is not a decision that should be taken lightly. Above all, you should consider where your child might be or want to go once finishing school in Egypt. Making a careful decision may be the difference between sending your child to a school for a British, American or International Baccalaureate education.

If you see your child continuing to live or study abroad, an International Baccalaureate will likely be the best choice, if not, it is probably better to have your child educated in the style of your home country. These decisions can play a role in the university admissions process later in your child’s life.

You should also be prepared for your child to undergo a significant period of adjustment when starting school in Egypt. He will likely be sharing a classroom with students from several different countries, including Egypt, and the classroom environment can be tumultuous, to say the least. One teacher at the British International School in Zamelek, Cairo suffered major damage to her vocal chords in while trying to reign in her rambunctious students.

Take time to listen to your child’s complaints while she is adjusting to a new school, new friends (not to mention new culture and language) in Egypt. Make sure to put a positive spin on your advice, encouraging her to reach out to the other children (or even mentioning how you are going through a similar process). Encourage a positive outlook, but don’t dismiss your child’s frustrations out of hand. If you begin to see signs of depression (loss of sleep, lack of appetite, et cetera) an adjustment in schools may be in order.

There are international schools located throughout Egypt, modelled on a number of foreign education systems. International schools usually cover education from kindergarten to the end of secondary school, though some also have pre-school programs for children as young as 3. The majority teach using either the British or American curricula (see below for some examples).

British Schools

  • British School of Alexandria (Alexandria)
  • EBIS (New Cairo – outside Cairo)
  • El Gouna International School (El Gouna – near Hurghada on the Red Sea)
  • Maadi Community School (Cairo)
  • New Cairo British International School

American Schools

  • Cairo Modern House (Giza, Cairo)
  • EAIS (New Cairo – outside Cairo)
  • International American School of Alexandria (Alexandria)
  • Misr American College (New Cairo)
  • New Generation Schools (Cairo)

Others

  • Cairo American College (Cairo, International Baccalaureate)
  • Ecole Moliere (Alexandria, French curriculum)
  • Greenland Pre Vert International School (International Baccalaureate)

Admissions

You will likely find the admissions process for international schools quite intense. If your child does not speak English, he or she may have to pass an English as a second language (ESL) test before even being considered for admission.

You should also be prepared to provide records of academic performance from previous school years (and in some cases letters of reference from school officials!). Do not be surprised if the school requests that you, your child and/or your spouse meet with the school superintendent for a personal interview prior to admission. For more specific information you should contact the school of your choice prior to enrolment.

Fees for private schools in Egypt

International schools the world over are known for their exorbitant fees. In Egypt, yearly tuition for a first-grader can cost well in excess of USD5,000! By the time your child reaches the upper grade levels, you may well find yourself paying more than you would for a university education at home. In addition, most schools usually charge a one-off admission fee of between USD1,000-2,000.

There is little you can do to defray this cost, aside from shopping around. You may be assessed additional fees on a yearly basis to defray the cost of activities and uniforms (almost all international schools require students to wear uniforms).

Fortunately, if your employer is arranging for you to relocate to Egypt, you may be able to arrange for compensation for your children’s schooling (in the same way that you may be given a housing allowance or a “hardship” bonus). If your employer does not mention schooling when initially discussing your compensation, make sure to broach the subject. Obviously, if you are looking for work in Egypt (as opposed to being transferred by your current employer) you will probably not have this luxury.

Choosing a school

Choosing a school for your child is not a decision that should be taken lightly. Above all, you should consider where your child might be or want to go once finishing school in Egypt. Making a careful decision may be the difference between sending your child to a school for a British, American or International Baccalaureate education.

If you see your child continuing to live or study abroad, an International Baccalaureate will likely be the best choice, if not, it is probably better to have your child educated in the style of your home country. These decisions can play a role in the university admissions process later in your child’s life.

You should also be prepared for your child to undergo a significant period of adjustment when starting school in Egypt. He will likely be sharing a classroom with students from several different countries, including Egypt, and the classroom environment can be tumultuous, to say the least. One teacher at the British International School in Zamelek, Cairo suffered major damage to her vocal chords in while trying to reign in her rambunctious students.

Take time to listen to your child’s complaints while she is adjusting to a new school, new friends (not to mention new culture and language) in Egypt. Make sure to put a positive spin on your advice, encouraging her to reach out to the other children (or even mentioning how you are going through a similar process). Encourage a positive outlook, but don’t dismiss your child’s frustrations out of hand. If you begin to see signs of depression (loss of sleep, lack of appetite, et cetera) an adjustment in schools may be in order.

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